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Zoë Marriott

Zoë Marriott

Zoë Marriott is the critically acclaimed author of eight feminist, diverse novels for young adults, which draw strongly on world mythology, fairytales and folklore. Her first book, The Swan Kingdom (Walker Books, 2007), based on Hans Christian Anderson’s ‘The Wild Swans’, was written when she was just twenty-one. It went on to become a USBBY Outstanding International book, was shortlisted for the Lincolnshire Young People’s book award, longlisted for the Branford Boase award, and was…

Jeremy Seal

Jeremy Seal

Jeremy Seal writes non-fiction books which combine travel and history, often taking the culture of Turkey – a life-long interest – as their inspiration. His books include: A Fez of the Heart: Travels Around Turkey in Search of a Hat (Picador, 1995) which was short-listed for the Thomas Cook/Daily Telegraph Travel Book Award; The Snakebite Survivors Club: Travels Among Serpents (Picador, 1999) which was a New York Public Library ‘Exceptional Book of the Year’; The

Ann Morgan

Ann Morgan

…that stories have to bridge cultural, temporal, political and religious divides. Ann continues to blog about international literature at ayearofreadingtheworld.com. She has given a TED talk, and her literary journey has inspired and informed many personal and group ventures around the globe. As a result, she sits on English PEN’s PEN Translates funding panel and has helped draw up the longlists for several literary prizes, including the Commonwealth Foundation’s short story prize and the FT/OppenheimerFunds…

Helen Grant

Helen Grant

Helen Grant writes Gothic thrillers for a crossover (young adult/adult) audience. She draws on atmospheric locations and local folklore for inspiration; her books are distinctive for their international settings. Her first novel, The Vanishing of Katharina Linden, was published by Penguin in 2009; it was shortlisted for the CILIP Carnegie Medal and the Booktrust Teenage prize, and won an ALA Alex award in the USA. Since then, Helen has written a further five…

Anita Mason

Anita Mason

Anita Mason is a novelist who is drawn to ideas but also enjoys telling a good story. Her books range widely in subject-matter and setting but have in common an interest in history, religion and the compromises imposed by politics. Her first novel Bethany ambiguously probes a high-minded commune in 1970s Cornwall; her second The Illusionist, shortlisted for the 1983 Booker prize, tracks the spectacular and scurrilous career of Simon Magus and the divisions among…

Jonathan  Gregson

Jonathan Gregson

…and business journalism has been published in numerous newspapers and magazines, including the Financial Times, Independent, Daily Telegraph, Fortune, National Geographic and the Wall Street Journal. He was editor of CAM (Cambridge Alumni Magazine), editorial consultant for FIRST magazine, and is a commentator on South Asia for BBC programmes. He taught history at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, in 1975-6 and at Pembroke College in Oxford while studying for a D.Phil. from 1977 to 1980….

Roopa Farooki

Roopa Farooki

Roopa Farooki was born in Lahore, Pakistan and brought up in London. She read PPE at New College, Oxford, and turned to writing after careers in corporate finance and advertising. She has written six novels to critical acclaim: Bitter Sweets (Macmillan, 2007), Corner Shop (Macmillan, 2008), The Way Things Look to Me (Macmillan, 2009), Half Life (Macmillan, 2010), The Flying Man (Headline, 2012) and The Good Children (Headline/Tinder Press, 2014). She has twice…

Katharine Quarmby

Katharine Quarmby

…a contributor for Mosaic Science. She has particular interests in science, politics and social affairs, and has been shortlisted for the Paul Foot award for many years of campaigning journalism on disability affairs. Her most recent non-fiction project is her first venture into ghost-writing, a book about so-called ‘honour’ based violence, with a British Yemeni survivor of the crime. She is also working with storytellers from nomadic communities on an exciting project to turn folk…

Jim Kelly

Jim Kelly

Jim Kelly was born in 1957, and is the son of a Scotland Yard detective. His first crime mystery The Water Clock was published in 2002 and was shortlisted for the Crime Writers’ Association John Creasy award for best debut. In 2006 he won the Crime Writers’ Assocation’s dagger-in-the-library award (chosen by readers) for the Philip Dryden novels, set in the Black Fen of Cambridgeshire. In 2011 Death Watch, the second in the…

Tamar Yellin

Tamar Yellin

…Muslims and Jews. A lifelong Brontë enthusiast, she also works as a volunteer guide and speaker at the Brontë Parsonage Museum. Tamar received her B.A. degree from Oxford University in Hebrew and Arabic. She has worked as a primary school teacher and a college lecturer in Judaism. She recently completed a gothic novel, set in a Victorian hydro over 160 years and dealing with obsessive love, madness, suicide and ghosts, both literal and metaphorical. There…