Articles

Clare Bayley reflects on the process of choosing names for characters and gives some famous examples, from Le Carré to Shakespeare, of writers who’ve answered the question: ‘What’s in a name?’ in an intriguing or provocative way.
In the course of his writing career, Robin Blake has become used to being asked all kinds of questions by members of the public. But what he describes as ‘not really a question at all, but a challenge’ is his least favourite of these.
Having lived in Italy for twenty years, Tobias Jones has come to realise that his literary style has been affected in more ways than he might have anticipated by his habitual use of Italian. Here he describes how this ‘linguistic exile’ has shaped his writing.
Listening to the radio as a child sparked Martin Sketchley’s lifelong love of the medium, and inspired his early writing of radio drama.
Tiffany Murray’s mother worked for a time as a cook for various rock bands, including Freddie Mercury’s Queen. Here, Murray describes what it was like growing up in such ‘Bohemian’ company.
Mark Morris explains why he’s proud to call himself a horror writer, and why the short story is the ‘lifeblood’ of the genre.
Michael McMillan charts his beginnings as a writer and artist, and the ambivalence of a double consciousness, of being British yet not feeling at home in the place one was born in, as a recurring theme in his work.