Articles

Stephanie Norgate reflects on why are there so many films with a writer as the central character and why the writer in question is so often a man.
Arriving in Amsterdam to research a novel set during the Occupation, Christina Koning found herself in the middle of the city’s annual street party. At first this carnival atmosphere seemed a distraction from the themes of her book, but then she began to see that it might prove relevant after all.
Plot is often the hardest thing to get right when starting a novel, argues Beatrice Colin, but surely (as F. Scott Fitzgerald is said to have remarked) plot and character are inseparable? She outlines some of her own strategies for getting to grips with the story.
How writing poetry became a free imaginative space for Gerry Cambridge after the strictures of popular journalism.
In the course of his writing career, Brian McCabe has discerned the influence of a number of other writers on his own work — influences which may or may not have proved enduring. Here he considers some of the more important.
From the early years of her writing career, Sally Cline has lived near water: by a river or by the sea. She considers how this has influenced her writing.
As a writer of historical fiction, Morgen Witzel has become adept at conveying a feeling of what the past was like through its sensual qualities, of which smell is the most powerfully visceral. As he argues here, there’s nothing like it for creating a psychological mood — or for summoning up unconscious memories.
In search of inspiration for her first novel, Karen Wallace went back to her former home in Canada, and found herself reliving a hair-raising childhood adventure.