Articles

In the course of his writing career, Brian McCabe has discerned the influence of a number of other writers on his own work — influences which may or may not have proved enduring. Here he considers some of the more important.
From the early years of her writing career, Sally Cline has lived near water: by a river or by the sea. She considers how this has influenced her writing.
As a writer of historical fiction, Morgen Witzel has become adept at conveying a feeling of what the past was like through its sensual qualities, of which smell is the most powerfully visceral. As he argues here, there’s nothing like it for creating a psychological mood — or for summoning up unconscious memories.
In search of inspiration for her first novel, Karen Wallace went back to her former home in Canada, and found herself reliving a hair-raising childhood adventure.
As a dramatist, Fraser Grace has become used to working with other writers, in order to turn their original work into plays. Here he describes some of his more unusual – and rewarding – collaborations.
No two writing residencies are the same, says Katherine Stansfield, but they can offer rewards far beyond the pleasures of having one’s work read, or listened to, by a diverse audience. She describes two very different experiences of working in the public domain.
When asked to write a play about pioneering and adventurous women, Anna Reynolds found herself spoilt for choice. With so many inspiring figures – from Boudicca to the WWII ‘attagirls’ – the question was not whom to include, but whom she could bear to leave out.
According to Miranda Miller, Patrick Hamilton is ‘one of the great London writers’, whose novels offer a dark and troubling picture of the postwar years, reflecting, she suggests, the turbulent events of his own life.