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Kate Worsley speaks with Bethan Roberts about the rich vernacular in her historical novel She Rises, the origins of its intertwined structure, what learning to sail taught her about character and how her novel has grown into a trilogy.

Kate Worsley speaks with Bethan Roberts about the substantial retraining she took when switching from journalism to fiction writing, the research joy to be found in both disciplines, the problem of impostor syndrome and the value of a good mentor.

Chris Westwood shares his Break Point experience, explaining how a reset period in a fresh location helped him both to recover his creative writing self and to understand what had happened to disable it.

Emma Darwin recalls the early days of online writing communities, and explains how her popular blog “This Itch of Writing” came into being.

Andrew Cowan speaks with Bethan Roberts about escaping the noose of perfectionism, what research brings to the writing process and what ‘write what you know’ really means in every genre, his ongoing imposter syndrome and the relative pleasures of writing fiction and guide-books.

Andrew Cowan speaks with Bethan Roberts about growing up as a working class boy in Corby, eventually taking a Creative Writing MA mostly because he liked being a student, the way his writing proceeds from the visual to the written to the auditory and the slow genesis and under-appreciated success of his first novel.

Sarah LeFanu speaks with Ann Morgan about how activism preceded authorship, writing a critical history of women’s speculative fiction because she wanted to teach it, her experiences in revolutionary Mozambique and her role in the Women’s Press and the subsequent illusion of ‘post-feminism’.

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