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Linda Cracknell travels to France in the footsteps of Robert Louis Stevenson, considering the effects of motion and travel on writing and discovering that sitting beside a river can be as much of a journey as sitting on a long distance train.

Dan Richards visits the beautiful archipelago that provided both part-time home and profound inspiration for one of Finland’s best-loved writers.

Valerie Gillies speaks with Doug Johnstone about poetry’s place in Scottish life, her multi-disciplinary practice inspired by studies in 1970s India and ongoing collaborations, and her role as a practitioner in arts-based health work.

Catherine O'Flynn is surprised by the dearth of literature about car boot sales, the ideal place to take your internal apocalpysometer for a spin.

Stuart Walton recalls the Pleasureland Fairground, home of ‘The Rides’, an experience that grew with him and his sister throughout their youth.

Bashabi Fraser speaks with Ann Morgan about becoming a writer and researcher in London and Bengal, bridging two worlds as a ‘Scottish Indian’, the tremendous inspiration of her biographee Rabindranath Tagore and the rare privilege of 'gift' poems.

Nick Caistor speaks with Ann Morgan about discovering other realities through language learning at school and in Argentina, the chameleon nature of translation and challenges such as humour, and the importance of maintaining a regular creative writing practice in your own language.

Cherise Saywell speaks with Doug Johnstone about the correspondence course that showed her she had something to say, the striking sense of place in her writing, her love of clean, understated prose and the benefits of continuing to write short stories alongside her novels.

Stephen Sharkey asks why anybody would want to turn a perfectly good novel into a stage play, and explains the value in turning the solitary pursuit of reading into the shared experience of theatre.

Bill Kirton considers Gustav Flaubert’s masterpiece, suggesting that its irregularities might be subversion rather than error, and spends an evening with his eponymous heroine.

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