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Becca Heddle speaks with Jane Draycott about discovering traditional African ‘dilemma’ tales, the psychological dimensions of cloning in her new YA novel, and the continuing need for bold fiction writing for younger readers.

Nicola Baldwin speaks with Amanda Whittington about the distinctive nature of radio drama, how the unique demands of the medium shape her writing, and why radio offers a radical way to tell stories by, for and about women’s lives.

Christie Dickason shares the extraordinary experience of learning to assert her place in a wild wolf pack, and how navigating that lupine environment has permanently transformed her writing practice.

Zoë Marriott speaks with Amanda Whittington about identity politics and feminism in her YA fantasy fiction, why diversity is a deliberate and essential choice and how she fuses historical facts with fantasy worlds to find a 21st century truth.

Tania Hershman explores the cornucopia of libraries offered by the great northern city of Manchester, including private and public collections and modern trimmings including digital pianos and foosball tables.

Rick Stroud takes us to St James’ Square and the quiet sanctuary of the London Library, a private and productive space beloved by writers and readers alike.

Stephen Romer speaks with John Greening about the themes and technical preoccupations of his poetry, his life in France, his poetic influences and the deeply personal source material that inspired one of his collections.

Stephanie Norgate explores her practice of keeping notebooks, relishing the 'unexpected jewels' they produce, and shares her fascination with the notebooks of other writers and the remarkable insights they can provide.

Alyson Hallett speaks with Jane Draycott about the migration of stones and people, the mischief of making anonymous work, the responsibility of writing for public spaces, and writing decades later about a secret affair.

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