All items: abandoning work

Julian Turner speaks with Amanda Whittington about the ways in which his psychotherapeutic practice has influenced his writing, how metaphor and creativity are important in more than just literary practice, the role of religion and the human capability to transcend experiences of cruelty.

Writing is a craft, not some divine gift, and the thing about crafts is the more you do them the better you get at them; so if you want to call yourself a professional writer... you really have to put the hours in.

Mark McCrum speaks with James McConnachie about his long term background efforts in fiction, his experiences with self-publishing and how to do it properly, finding success in genre fiction and his openness to whatever comes next.

Perhaps your subject went away; the war ended; you moved from your special place; the poet of youth grew old, or became Poet Laureate.

Susan Fletcher explores the experience of outsiderhood, both physical and social, and its influence on her writing, and wonders whether readers, too, are increasingly recognising themselves in outsider protagonists.

Lucy Flannery describes how an idle moment on twitter led to her accidentally writing a novel, and how the process of doing so raised old demons about her right to be an author.

I went back to my hotel room, leafed through the mound of tattered pages on the desk, and wished with all my heart that I could be working on something very, very simple.

Jane Shilling speaks with Robin Blake about how learning to hunt inspired her first memoir, accepting botox in the name of art, writing without an audience in mind and moving to fiction in a new, metrics-driven publishing climate.

I'm avoiding the thousand yard stare of the blank page; I'm afraid of it. This is how it is before a work has taken shape, before it's found a life of its own. I stall because I'm wary of beginning the long journey.