All items: Agatha Christie

In those happy bygone days when I was a smoker I would wake early, make myself a coffee, tuck myself up on the sofa with a book and read for an hour before breakfast: three fags.
His diary of being a Jewish teenager in Vienna in 1938; a writer doesn't have to be famous to make you think, and feel, and remember their work. I read George Clare's book only once, but I've never been able to forget it.
I felt that the characters in Tyler's fiction were true to the tips of their fingers, knotted into their world by their relationships and their sprawling dysfunctional families. I believed every word they said.

Elanor Dymott speaks with Robin Blake about storytelling’s essential role in the British legal system, migrating from law journalism to fiction, and the childhood origins of an unsettling recurrent theme in her writing.

I am never without a book. It would be tortuous for me to be on a journey, short or long, without something to read. I have books in the bathroom, bedroom and the living room.
When advances dwindle and rejections become legion - each more hurtful than the last - I remember McCullers, Proust, Balzac and the many others who fought the good fight.
Catherine Czerkawska considers the pleasures and drawbacks of writing a series of novels, looking at various celebrated examples, from Agatha Christie’s Poirot stories to J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter, and wondering if she too has the stamina to sustain a lengthy series.
Often I am at a loss to map the routes that have brought me to particular titles. Many of the books I now regard as foundational seem to have been discovered more or less by accident, often as impulse buys in charity shops.
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