All items: Arthur Conan Doyle

John Harrison describes his investigations into the earliest human societies, and what he looks for when he is on the trail of these ancient settlements.
Being able to spend three years in the company of extraordinary characters such as Ian Fleming, Rudyard Kipling, Dylan Thomas, Arthur Conan Doyle and Wilkie Collins has been more than a privilege, it has helped make me who I am.

Leigh Russell speaks with Robin Blake about becoming a crime writer in her fifties, writing series books that can also stand alone, what readers want from her genre and her surprising crime-writing hero.

Morgen Witzel compares history and historical fiction. Good history tells us what probably happened. Good historical fiction tells us what might have happened, and makes us believe it is real.
Most writers need to support themselves financially, one reason why the RLF has proved a lifeline to many. Sue Fletcher pays tribute to the organisation which has enabled her to ‘write without worrying’, and reflects on the wide variety of other jobs she has taken over the years in order to support her writing career.
Science Fiction is still occasionally dismissed as a ‘popular’ genre, without literary merit. Brian Clegg considers why this is and suggests it is time for a change of attitude.
Why do some writers choose to use a name other than the one they were born with for their writing? John Pilkington looks at some of the reasons why authors throughout history have adopted pseudonyms, and wonders if it has something to do with the need to reinvent oneself.
Generally associated with fortune-telling rather than story-telling, the Tarot can be a valuable asset to a writer, argues Diane Samuel, offering a range of archetypes and narrative possibilities which can help unlock the creative impulse.
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