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Gabriel Gbadamosi finds his talisman, and his Yoruba spiritual counterpart, in a junk shop statue.
30-01-2020

Michael McMillan takes us on a tour through his interdisciplinary creative career, spanning visual arts, theatre and other kinds of writing, collaboration and curating, in 'On Reflection'.

'I've heard tell of the psychopathology of answering machines, the ghost-in-the-machine poetry of microprocessors, but I've watched the use of Facebook profiling by editorial committees: what is our demographic looking for?'
09-01-2020

Mark McCrum speaks with James McConnachie about his first travel writing adventures in South Africa during the last days of apartheid, being sent rather unwillingly for a further book about Australia, and working out what you’re writing about as you go along.

19-12-2019

Dipo Agboluaje speaks with Gabriel Gbadamosi about Britain and Nigeria, the big dreams of his characters and his knack of combining satire with character development, and the necessity for diverse playwrights to aim for the mainstream.

14-11-2019

Rukhsana Ahmad speaks with John Siddique about her peripatetic childhood in Pakistan, how her concern for other people motivates her to keep writing across years and genres, and how she’s avoided the constraints of the ‘post-colonial’.

31-10-2019

Donny O’Rourke visits old haunts in Dumfries and the Borders, ghosted by the bards of Scotland’s past, for the liminal Celtic festival of Samhain.

Julian Turner considers the usefulness of imagination, not just to the writer, but also to the exile and the abused child, and suggests that metaphorical thinking may be psychologically essential.

Michael McMillan charts his beginnings as a writer and artist, and the ambivalence of a double consciousness, of being British yet not feeling at home in the place one was born in, as a recurring theme in his work.
10-10-2019

Dipo Agboluaje explains how migrating from London to his family’s homeland of Nigeria as a young boy shaped his interest in playwriting, with inspiration along the way from diverse mythologies.

Penny Hancock wonders when it's legitimate, if your professional occupation leaves you free to manage your own time and involves an activity other people do simply for pleasure, to say that writing is your career?

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