All items: children's writing

I write because I can make a world in my head come alive on the stage or screen. I get to see the people who rattled around in my imagination eventually move out into a home of their own.
Be yourself. Write the story that is growing in your head, not the one you think an editor might like to read. Be. Yourself.

Max Eilenberg speaks with John Siddique about the importance of love in children’s fiction, his previous career in publishing, retelling a traditional fairytale and his enduring enthusiasm for the work of Bob Dylan.

Under pressure, or in the grip of a story I can't tear myself from, I occasionally read as I walk along the street. Fortunately I have great peripheral vision for lamp posts and other pedestrians.
It is sometimes hard to distinguish between memorable books and inspiring books. I remember books for various reasons, often to do with characterisation and dialogue.

James McConnachie looks back on the gender bifurcation of childhood reading - and reminds us not to underestimate the gender-transcending power of the empathetic imagination.

Mark McCrum leads us into the strange world of the ghost writer, whose perilous path encounters both too little and too much material, and where the famous subjects of ghost-written autobiographies can co-operate or not.

Immersed in domains of magic and adventure, I wondered how these story people tackled the great unknown. What did they feel at a given moment? Why did strangers choose to help or hinder them?
So much more satisfactory than speech; you can correct it, remould it, hone it ceaselessly, if you like, before you deliver it. The pleasure is not just in the moment, it can be lasting.