All items: China

Nick Holdstock speaks with John Siddique about living in and writing about China and the nature of the 'Chinese dream', his unexpected job cataloguing the book collection of the late Doris Lessing, and the inspiration of serendipitous finds in second-hand books.

Susan Barker speaks with Cherise Saywell about the international origins of her novels, the way her characters and storylines emerge organically as she writes and her experiences living in Japan and China.

Nigel Cliff speaks with James McConnachie about the 19th century 'Shakespeare Riots' in New York, what might be driving his choice of subjects, and the differences between the US and UK publishing industries.

Part-philosophy, part-erotica, part-poetic stream of consciousness, The Lover translates the strangeness of Duras' world, of being in it, onto the page with perfect pitch.
Research for a novel led Beatrice Colin to Argyllshire’s Benmore Gardens, and sparked a fascination with all things horticultural and with the Victorian plant hunters who first brought non-native species to Scotland.

John Keay speaks with James McConnachie about relics of Empire and roving Scots, the other writers in his family and the hectic schedule of non-fiction writers with new books to promote.

Jonny Wright considers the sobering parallels between the 1959 play A Raisin In The Sun, featuring a black family in Southside Chicago, and the racial inequality, downward economic mobility and defacto housing segregation of contemporary London.

Kerry Young describes her journey from failing 'O'-level English to becoming a successful novelist, and how her writing is a gift both to her late father and to the diverse cultures that have produced contemporary Jamaica.

John Keay speaks with James McConnachie about hands-on historical researches from the Himalaya to the Highlands, his best writing advice and the idea that what historians really need is not more documents but stronger boots.

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