All items: Cynthia Rogerson

In writing about her past, Cynthia Rogerson found that employing the unvarnished truth rather than the embellishments of fiction was sometimes a more powerful way of describing uncomfortable events.
During a science fiction addiction I wrote to Isaac Asimov: "I think you should know that my academic failure is entirely due to the addicting nature of your books. Thank you."

Cherise Saywell describes how an unexpected writing career descended into paralysis, and how a short and anonymously-published piece helped her to reconnect with what she loves about writing.

Cynthia Rogerson explains how escaping to a weekly writing group turned her from a frustrated mother-of-many to a fledgling novelist, who discovered that as far as family went, ‘it was extraordinary how happy we all were just suiting ourselves’.

Cynthia Rogerson speaks with James McConnachie about ensuring realism in her novels, disliking positive discrimination, and putting up with having her serious novels packaged in chick-lit covers.

Cynthia Rogerson contemplates the literary spurs of exile and outsiderhood, wonders whether she would have written any novels if she’d simply stayed at home in the USA, and explains why being a writer is easier in Scotland than in California.

Brian McAvera considers what we’ve lost in favouring naturalistic, TV-esque theatre over the wider and deeper possibilities offered by non-naturalism.

ded for publication but that does not lessen their potential influence. In this miniature memoir – and fierce defence of the epistolary form – the novelist Cynthia Rogerson considers the many ways that letters she has written have affected her life and the lives of those close to her.
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