All items: D.H. Lawrence

Katharine McMahon celebrates the role that public libraries have played in her life, from her earliest discovery of the magic of books as a child, to her later career as a writer.
A poet who does not figure in my childhood anthology but who has become very important for me in adulthood is Emily Dickinson. If Dylan Thomas introduces you to intoxication, Dickinson shows you how to distill it.
When I first heard a poet read, in a chemistry laboratory at Newcastle University, he was Ted Hughes; his gruff Yorkshire voice threw me onto a frosty moor. I could see horses. Hear horizons.

Mary Colson takes us to Olney in north Buckinghamshare, her childhood home and the site of an historic friendship between a poet and a slave trader.

Simon Rae takes us to Great Tew in north Oxfordshire, an estate village that began with lofty aspirations but descended to decrepitude.

History books changed my life, particularly social and feminist history because they showed me myself, and the world beyond my small boundaries.

Judy Brown considers how two decades spent as a practising lawyer have impacted her experiences and processes of writing, and considers the parallels and contrasts between the law and poetry.

Martina Evans considers her unlikely literary beginnings as the youngest of ten in a County Cork family: ‘I was known as a dreamer, a fumbler, a fool; if I was so busy dreaming, how did I notice so many things? My family asked this question too, even then.’

The novel was written in a language deeply unfamiliar to me, the broken English of a black girl in the American South of the early twentieth century, and it spoke to me like nothing I had ever read.

Sarah Ardizzone and Euan Cameron speak with fellow translator Nick Caistor about the pleasures and challenges of rendering another writer's work into a new language — and what liberties a translator should and shouldn't take.

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