All items: D.H. Lawrence

Jonny Wright considers the sobering parallels between the 1959 play A Raisin In The Sun, featuring a black family in Southside Chicago, and the racial inequality, downward economic mobility and defacto housing segregation of contemporary London.

Kerry Young describes her journey from failing 'O'-level English to becoming a successful novelist, and how her writing is a gift both to her late father and to the diverse cultures that have produced contemporary Jamaica.

All writers are familiar with the horrors of the blank page, but just what is the process that leads to filling it with words? Neil Rollinson has some thoughts on this, and on what happens after words are committed to paper.
ded for publication but that does not lessen their potential influence. In this miniature memoir – and fierce defence of the epistolary form – the novelist Cynthia Rogerson considers the many ways that letters she has written have affected her life and the lives of those close to her.

John Siddique speaks with Frances Byrnes about his troubled childhood, how literature provided him with a proxy family, and the power of colours in his own writing.

Poets have always looked inward. They have always been fascinated by transformation. Few, however, have considered how the act of writing poetry itself might change them. The poet John Greening looks within, and behind, and finds himself changed.
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