All items: disability

Susan Fletcher explores the experience of outsiderhood, both physical and social, and its influence on her writing, and wonders whether readers, too, are increasingly recognising themselves in outsider protagonists.

Lucy Flannery describes how an idle moment on twitter led to her accidentally writing a novel, and how the process of doing so raised old demons about her right to be an author.

As darkness fell on each painful night, I reconstructed the book from memory, trying to get a little further each time before looking back at the text. Instead of dwelling on the life I couldn't live I retold this story.

Jackie Wills joins host Julia Copus to discuss two favourite classic poems, ‘How do I love thee?’ and ‘Grief', both by Elizabeth Barrett Browning, in our ongoing 'Poetry Break' series.

Having grown up with a chronic illness, Ann Morgan became fascinated by the number of other writers who have suffered from poor health and by the way some have explored this in their writing.
I was a reader not a writer, and in my spare time I would escape into any book I could find which meant that one day, by chance, really, I picked up 'Misery' by Stephen King.

Penny Black speaks with Frances Byrnes about teenage summers in Vienna, the shock of revisiting old contracts, and how her desire to speak perfect German accidentally led to a passionate career in writing for theatre.

Working with a group of young carers, on a play about their experiences, Anna Reynolds discovered that working in collaboration with others – especially those with such decided views about how their lives should be portrayed – presented challenges, but also led to triumphs.

Katharine Quarmby spends a diary week researching and editing her first novel, a work of historical fiction inspired by a cruel act of punishment, and finds the process surprisingly familiar.

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