All items: Doug Johnstone

You were a journalist, an engineer and a physicist. Space is still exciting and you wouldn't believe some of the discoveries scientists have made. But sadly, aliens still haven't been in touch yet.

Doug Johnstone speaks with Cherise Saywell about shifting from engineering to domestic noir via music journalism, exploring conflicted masculinity in his work, and being part of the Tartan Noir family of Scottish crime writers.

I try to write at least a thousand words a day. I write fast and in short bursts to keep the energy of the prose up, and I write in the mornings when my brain is at its sharpest.

Stephen Wyatt takes us to an unusual destination: the Gallifrey One convention, where participants are enthusiastic, oddly dressed, and gratifyingly appreciative of his own 30-year-old TV script.

Doug Johnstone reminds us that no completed novel lives up to what its creator initially imagined, and explains how a complete failure three books in led him to find his true writing voice.

Sallis' novels are among the best I've ever read. He really pushes the boundaries of what crime writing is, and his more recent work has been full of existential exploration.

In ‘Writing vs Life: The Pram in the Hall’, we talk to a number of RLF writers about the challenges of balancing parenthood and a professional writing career, and whether mothers and fathers still have differing experiences in this area.

As a former member of a rock band who has also been a music journalist, Doug Johnstone has always felt that music was essential to his writing. Here he considers other writers who have also made a career out of music — and vice versa.
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