All items: editing

Julian Turner speaks with Amanda Whittington about the ways in which his psychotherapeutic practice has influenced his writing, how metaphor and creativity are important in more than just literary practice, the role of religion and the human capability to transcend experiences of cruelty.

Most often I get stuck at the ends and beginnings and of chapters. I can't start the next chapter until the end of the last one is right. I know this usually means that whatever I've written has to be cut.
I was writing my first novel, a convoluted, pretentious and, as it turned out, unpublishable thriller. "How do you feel about it?" he asked.
Writing is a craft, not some divine gift, and the thing about crafts is the more you do them the better you get at them; so if you want to call yourself a professional writer... you really have to put the hours in.
When she started working as a law reporter, Elanor Dymott was under the impression that she was following in the footsteps of Charles Dickens. But Dickens, she discovered, never wrote a law report in his life. Still, it made a good story…
My starting point for the Jamestown book was a manuscript list of nearly sixty women sent over to Virginia, which I consulted one freezing December morning in the Pepys Library at Magdalene College, Cambridge.

Nick Holdstock speaks with John Siddique about living in and writing about China and the nature of the 'Chinese dream', his unexpected job cataloguing the book collection of the late Doris Lessing, and the inspiration of serendipitous finds in second-hand books.

One word after another, writing is walking; the journey completes itself. Through the labyrinth, one word after another. Just write the next word.