All items: Elanor Dymott

The routes to possession of a book are many and various; you might, for example, have stolen it. Instead I will simply thank you for deciding to read it.
When she started working as a law reporter, Elanor Dymott was under the impression that she was following in the footsteps of Charles Dickens. But Dickens, she discovered, never wrote a law report in his life. Still, it made a good story…

In ‘My Hero', we talk to a number of RLF writers about their personal heroes, and how those heroes have had an impact on their lives and their writing.

As darkness fell on each painful night, I reconstructed the book from memory, trying to get a little further each time before looking back at the text. Instead of dwelling on the life I couldn't live I retold this story.
Call me crazy but after that first novel was out I avoided libraries. Books became alien; standing in a bookshop one afternoon I felt physically sick, so strong was my aversion.
Poetry is a great thing to give a novelist, I think. Very few of the volumes I own are ones I chose for myself. A treasured collection is by Harry Martinson, sent me by a friend and colleague which I'd otherwise never have come across.

Elanor Dymott explains how an encounter with the tangible aspects of photography, during deeply immersive research for her second novel, almost stopped her being a novelist.

Alex Martin considers whether it's better to be a man of action, or to live a more contemplative life. Or can a writer do both?

As the story develops, corridors are re-positioned and walls punctuated by gates that were never there. This helps me to resolve problems in the narrative, or invent new scenes.
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