All items: Elizabeth Bishop

The compulsion to write is paradoxically both a celebration of life, and a protest at its passing; not that I think about this when I'm actually at my desk with a pen in my hand.
The inspiration here has involved a movement from poetry to prose. This is something that pleases me immensely; one genre fertilising another.
Poets have always looked inward. They have always been fascinated by transformation. Few, however, have considered how the act of writing poetry itself might change them. The poet John Greening looks within, and behind, and finds himself changed.

Is writing a ruthless business? How much honesty is too much? Should you mine your own life for stories? RLF writers explore this literary quandary in 'The Splinter of Ice'.

Fiona Shaw tells Frances Byrnes of how she felt an affinity with her PhD subject — the poet, Elizabeth Bishop — but never anticipated being a writer herself until severe emotions forced something out of her.

Every writer has a file, a drawer or a cupboard of unfinished or unpublished books. After going through his own dusty box file, Rupert Christiansen considers the classic novels that once lived as ‘zombies’ — and finds new hope that his own may yet come to life.