All items: Emily Bronte

Alice turned me into an addict. I became an avid reader, always in search of fantasies; science fiction, adventure, mysteries and later detective fiction and romances, in both English and Urdu, fed my insatiable thirst.
Funny isn't it how you don't consider for a second that you can be a writer even though it's what you love doing the most? Well you can, and please don't take as long as I did to realise it.

Judy Brown considers how two decades spent as a practising lawyer have impacted her experiences and processes of writing, and considers the parallels and contrasts between the law and poetry.

Martina Evans considers her unlikely literary beginnings as the youngest of ten in a County Cork family: ‘I was known as a dreamer, a fumbler, a fool; if I was so busy dreaming, how did I notice so many things? My family asked this question too, even then.’

She recited poems to me that she'd learned at school before leaving at 14 to help tend to soldiers returning wounded from the First World War, and recounted the Greek myths that, as an autodidact, she'd later immersed herself in.
Why do some writers choose to use a name other than the one they were born with for their writing? John Pilkington looks at some of the reasons why authors throughout history have adopted pseudonyms, and wonders if it has something to do with the need to reinvent oneself.
An avid reader from childhood, Katharine McMahon found herself increasingly drawn into the world of that precociously literary family the Brontës, finding in their life histories, as much as in their novels, echoes of her own preoccupations and experience.