All items: Emily Dickinson

Perhaps your subject went away; the war ended; you moved from your special place; the poet of youth grew old, or became Poet Laureate.
A poet who does not figure in my childhood anthology but who has become very important for me in adulthood is Emily Dickinson. If Dylan Thomas introduces you to intoxication, Dickinson shows you how to distill it.
I still have my treasured copy of the sky-blue Heinemann edition of Selected Poems by Emily Dickinson, and I remember reading in Blackwell's bookshop some of her startling lines for the very first time.

Joanne Limburg and our host Julia Copus discuss two classic poems by Mathilde Blind, a once-celebrated, now neglected poet, scholar and intellectual, in another instalment of our special ‘Poetry Break’ series.

When I first heard a poet read, in a chemistry laboratory at Newcastle University, he was Ted Hughes; his gruff Yorkshire voice threw me onto a frosty moor. I could see horses. Hear horizons.
Researching her study of the artist Gwen John, Alicia Foster was struck by the attic setting of many of John’s paintings. This led her to a wider exploration of the role played by the attic room in art and literature.

Pippa Little speaks with Geoff Hattersley about poetry in her African and Scottish childhood, building a career as an early school leaver and her return to Higher Education, and her approaches to writing.

Chinua, an Igbo from Nigeria of my father's generation, who wrote Things Fall Apart with its title by an Irishman and its split focus between a pre-colonial West African people and culture and a British colonial administrator; it was, when I read it, the best thing I had ever read.