All items: Emma Darwin

Emma Darwin introduces the Instant Gratification Monkey, and his role as a productivity aid in her writing life.
You didn't know that the same shifts in history writing which meant that Unstead could write history for children largely from below, was also changing history for grown ups, and so changing the path you'd marked out for yourself.
"Murder your darlings" doesn't come from a Calvinist idea that anything that gives pleasure must be sinful; it's about forcing yourself to act on the little voice that goes on saying that a piece of writing isn't working in the story.

Is writing a ruthless business? How much honesty is too much? Should you mine your own life for stories? RLF writers explore this literary quandary in 'The Splinter of Ice'.

Emma Darwin retreats to country solitude, where she’s writing a memoir about failing to write a novel about her busy family history.

Charles Boyle and Fiona Shaw tell us about why they write, as featured in the Vox section of the RLF’s Showcase.

The RLF takes an inside look at how writers navigate the shoals of literary genre, and how they really see themselves — despite what those book blurbs might say.

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