All items: English Literature

‘Having a message’ or ‘wanting to say something’ is seen as preachy, cheesy, old-fashioned and generally a detriment to the development of great art. Not so, says Zoë Marriott, we all have a message to express.

Chris Arthur speaks with Cherise Saywell about the essay as a multifaceted and ‘heretical’ form, the notion of a ‘dangerously failed’ piece of work, and the encouraging fact that ‘If you can find the objects that speak to you, essays will follow’.

Jackie Wills joins host Julia Copus to discuss two favourite classic poems, ‘How do I love thee?’ and ‘Grief', both by Elizabeth Barrett Browning, in our ongoing 'Poetry Break' series.

He is fearful and hopeless, shabby and disreputable-looking; even his eventual martyrdom is squalid and he fluffs his final words. What impressed me, though, is that he keeps on trying.
He stood up and toured the crowded shelves of his study, picking up a book here and a book there. "Read these", he said, "Come back later in the summer and we'll discuss them."

Paula Byrne speaks with James McConnachie about Jane Austen’s laptop, why she wouldn’t write about somebody she had no affinity with, being a ‘footnote queen’, recovering lost women’s voices, and being a pioneer of the ‘partial life’ biography.

Jane Draycott joins host Julia Copus to discuss two favourite classic poems, ‘God’s Grandeur’ and ‘Felix Randal’, both by Gerard Manley Hopkins, in our ongoing 'Poetry Break' series.

Martina Evans joins host Julia Copus to discuss two favourite classic poems: ‘They Flee From Me’ by Sir Thomas Wyatt, suggested by Martina, and ‘Aspens’ by Edward Thomas, suggested by Julia, in the first installment of our new 'Poetry Break' series.