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Miranda Miller explores three major literary works published in 1922 and finds parallels between the social and political background that inspired them and our present decade.
Ray French examines the concept of voice confrontation – the term for a dislike of one’s own speaking voice – and the implications for writers who must read their work aloud, going back to his roots to discover the many elements that inform his approach to performing his writing.
17-12-2020

Mahendra Solanki speaks with Amanda Whittington about the meaning of ‘home’ in his poetry, the legacy of violence in his childhood, the vital role of libraries and the crucial difference between ‘writing and therapy’ and ‘writing as therapy’.

'When e-books appeared there were prophecies about The End Of The Book; now the publishing industry admits that e-book sales have peaked, and the hand-held printed book has a definite future. And the creative writing courses are exploding...'
01-10-2020

Stephen Romer speaks with John Greening about the themes and technical preoccupations of his poetry, his life in France, his poetic influences and the deeply personal source material that inspired one of his collections.

'The writers who first deeply influenced me were the Modernists; Woolf, Pound, Eliot, H.D. All working the edges of meaning, re-imagining form and image, experimenting.'
23-04-2020

Stephen Romer wrestles with a writing workshop, and the surprising worldview of his young participants, at a time of turbulence in his own writing life.

As the child of bookshop owners, Simon Rae grew up knowing that running a bookshop might be his destiny. But the revelation that he would rather write books than sell them took him along a different path…
'Once I start on a novel I write every day and become captivated by the way the story unfolds. Although as author I am notionally in charge, in fact I write to find what happens next.'
'Enchanted by the seductive music of this poem, its strangeness but also its powerful sense of reality; I didn't know exactly what it meant in the sense of its paraphrasable content, but its potency was unignorable. Imagine if one could write like this!'
'I don't know exactly when I gave up pretensions to being a serious reader, but the crime and children's books scattered around my bed indicate my current diet; I justify them on the grounds that I write both.'
'Chinua, an Igbo from Nigeria of my father's generation, who wrote Things Fall Apart with its title by an Irishman and its split focus between a pre-colonial West African people and culture and a British colonial administrator; it was, when I read it, the best thing I had ever read.'
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