All items: George Orwell

I feared these books would be dull, staid and part of the establishment that I was so busy rebelling against; and then I read Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte.
My version of Animal Farm would look at how the slave revolt works itself out; it would explore ideas of light-skinned privilege, and look at the privilege literacy gives you.
Advice from tutors is usually sound because they are thinking about the craft; advice from publishers is frequently disastrous because they are thinking about the market; reviewers are thinking about their reputation.
I've heard tell of the psychopathology of answering machines, the ghost-in-the-machine poetry of microprocessors, but I've watched the use of Facebook profiling by editorial committees: what is our demographic looking for?
Their care and attention, setting words on paper, makes you feel that thrill of recognition; you know with certainty that what they write is true, and you want to do what they do.
Her mother’s worsening dementia made Penny Hancock realise how important it is for people to feel at home — and why so many writers identify with a specific place.
When he came to move house, Roy Bainton was faced with the painful necessity of having to get rid of hundreds of well-loved books. But how to decide which should stay and which should go?
Having always been isolated I created imaginative worlds of my own, and I do so still. Oh dear! It all goes back to childhood then?