All items: Helen Dunmore

Robyn Marsack speaks with Cherise Saywell about how her interest in the literature of WW1 led her to the work of Edmund Blunden, about discovering her own grandfather’s WW1 writings, and an astonishing literary surprise.

A concession to the Indian climate is the solar topi he is holding on his lap. Although the topi had become a symbol of British power, because it was worn to protect the delicate white man from the blazing sun it also signalled the white man's vulnerability.

Pippa Little speaks with Geoff Hattersley about poetry in her African and Scottish childhood, building a career as an early school leaver and her return to Higher Education, and her approaches to writing.

Adaptations are everywhere. Less common is for writers themselves to work across different genres and different media. Linda Buckley-Archer explores what might happen when stories become ‘portable’. What, for writers, are the benefits and risks?
From William Carlos Williams’ prescription pads to George Szirtes’ Twitter-length stanzas, the medium has shaped the message of poetry. John Greening surveys the curious and influential choices made by modern poets.