All items: Herman Melville

Novels, depending on the genre, allow the reader to bring much of their own personal life to their stories, whereas plays are a different beast and rely on a great production and great acting.
I also aspire to read a play a day, which is unrealistic if you are a commissioned writer with a Netflix subscription, and a poem a day, which is more achievable.

Ann Morgan retells the grand old myth about becoming a published author, then takes her editorial red pen to all of its inaccuracies.

Nicholas Murray dissects his own reluctance to call himself a writer, after an early career in journalism and despite having subsequently published more than twenty books in a huge variety of genres.

When he came to move house, Roy Bainton was faced with the painful necessity of having to get rid of hundreds of well-loved books. But how to decide which should stay and which should go?

Jon Mayhew speaks with John Siddique about his typical working day, creating a plausible back-story for Jules Verne’s Captain Nemo while remaining true to Verne’s fictional universe, and making the leap from full-time employment to full-time writing.

I don't know exactly when I gave up pretensions to being a serious reader, but the crime and children's books scattered around my bed indicate my current diet; I justify them on the grounds that I write both.
Plot is often the hardest thing to get right when starting a novel, argues Beatrice Colin, but surely (as F. Scott Fitzgerald is said to have remarked) plot and character are inseparable? She outlines some of her own strategies for getting to grips with the story.

Roy Bainton speaks with Frances Byrnes about the stories an adventurous life accumulates, the increasing difficulty of surviving as a freelancer, and the way music and writing come together as a cornerstone of his career.

  • 1
  • 2