All items: history of writing

Eighty years after its publication, Ray French looks at how a famous novel and its film adaptation have overshadowed notions about Welshness, and how this might at last be changing.

Ian Thomson reads Dante's Divine Comedy as a spiritual journey that resonates with his own experience of addiction.

Trish Cooke speaks with Caroline Sanderson about her Dominican heritage, her Yorkshire upbringing, how her parents’ love of stories inspired her as a teller of tales, and how her career kicked off in multiple directions all at once.

Wendy Moore speaks with Catherine O’Flynn about the loss of diversity and career opportunities in journalism, historical characters who demand to be written about, and her motivation to find parallels between the past and the present.

When she started working as a law reporter, Elanor Dymott was under the impression that she was following in the footsteps of Charles Dickens. But Dickens, she discovered, never wrote a law report in his life. Still, it made a good story…
As a teenager I could really identify with Billy's feelings of being stifled and trapped by his environment and his family, and the need to get away and lead a more exciting, fulfilling and creative life.
Over his long career as an art critic, Brian McAvera has compiled a collection of catalogues of Irish art exhibitions, offering a unique overview of twentieth and twenty-first century literary, artistic, and political life.
Should I give way to this common feeling that artists should contribute something to society; that is, in addition to our work? The writer throughout history has always been a defender of the individual.