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12-11-2020

Horatio Clare takes us to Hebden Bridge and its connections with the poets Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes.

Lucy Moore celebrates the London she travels through at human pace on her bicycle.

Curtis Jobling recalls Great Sankey, where childhood phantoms became the grown-up imaginings of unsettling fantasy novels.

Dan Richards describes some of the quirkier objects writers have used as touchstones to inspire them to write, and some of the rituals they employ for the same reason.
Horatio Clare reflects on the challenges and rewards of researching and writing about his parents’ divorce, and its impact on him as a child.
Are writers mad — or only very sane? Horatio Clare reflects on this conundrum, with relation to his own experience of mental illness.
15-11-2018

In ‘Writing vs Life: On Balance’, we talk to a number of RLF writers about the challenges of balancing writing against other aspects of their lives, how to stay grounded, and whether it’s ok for artists to be selfish.

'Your university life will be blighted somewhat by a feeling that you can more or less cruise through the degree which will lead you to waste time and smoke much cannabis which will then lead you to depression. You'd be much better off taking on more work.'
22-02-2018

Horatio Clare speaks with James McConnachie about difficult journeys, the manic episode that cost him his notes for an entire project, and the difference between loneliness and love of solitude.

01-02-2018

Horatio Clare speaks with James McConnachie about the pleasures and plights of Welsh sheep-farming, the creative criminal record of his youth, and why writers should 'live it and leave it until it's ready' when using real life as material.

30-11-2017

Horatio Clare ponders the necessary pragmatism of the professional writer, and shares a glimpse of what writers really talk about amongst themselves.

Clare Pollard celebrates the playfulness and variety of nonsense verse, sharing examples from across the centuries.

Shanty-singing, bustle-wearing, wreath-laying, street parties, a campaign for lifeboats — her book about the Victorian reformer Samuel Plimsoll led the writer and journalist Nicolette Jones to embark on activities she never expected.
As a travel writer, Horatio Clare’s professional scepticism has been challenged by glimpses of what he calls ‘inexplicable truths’. A man in Mozambique who saw a mermaid, a Congolese witch who vouchsafed him protection from Ebola, a nightjar churring on a hillside in Wales — these, Clare argues, are ‘signs, wonders and mysteries’.
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