All items: humour

If the Muse is playing hard to get, I start with a scene I feel I know better, and if that works, I write another one. And then I join them up.
Be outrageous! When I was your age my writing was very conventional. I wouldn't offend anyone or express any controversial statements for fear of offending someone. Word would get around, I thought.
Would I be guilty of destroying the serious intent underneath the humour, with this 'coffin' stunt? Would I be guilty of stripping my protagonist of his dignity?

Susan Fletcher explores the experience of outsiderhood, both physical and social, and its influence on her writing, and wonders whether readers, too, are increasingly recognising themselves in outsider protagonists.

Lucy Flannery describes how an idle moment on twitter led to her accidentally writing a novel, and how the process of doing so raised old demons about her right to be an author.

You love Star Trek and Star Wars, because those things are like someone has gone into a laboratory and created the opposite of 1970s suburban London; don't feel guilty about enjoying popular culture by the way, it's going to have its moment.
When I'm writing a play I do sometimes imagine the audience reacting to a particular moment but not usually by vomiting, as happened once, or starting a fight.
One of you once told me you thought I'd been very brave to put so much of myself into the poetry. Consider that the opposite could be true; I have been successful in keeping the real me out.
While I was shy and embarrassed to begin with, I soon became obsessed. I didn't like the person I was turning into. Marketing brought out the pushy me.