All items: J. D. Salinger

In an increasingly homogenised and uniform world rare and distinctive voices are especially needful. Sometimes those voices may be complex, difficult, troubling, but who wants to read a bland book?
I feared these books would be dull, staid and part of the establishment that I was so busy rebelling against; and then I read Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte.

Ann Morgan retells the grand old myth about becoming a published author, then takes her editorial red pen to all of its inaccuracies.

Nicholas Murray dissects his own reluctance to call himself a writer, after an early career in journalism and despite having subsequently published more than twenty books in a huge variety of genres.

He stood up and toured the crowded shelves of his study, picking up a book here and a book there. "Read these", he said, "Come back later in the summer and we'll discuss them."
Whether in graphic novel form, or onscreen, superheroes have become ubiquitous, over the past few decades. Mark Illis considers the reasons for this continuing fascination.
Every writer has a file, a drawer or a cupboard of unfinished or unpublished books. After going through his own dusty box file, Rupert Christiansen considers the classic novels that once lived as ‘zombies’ — and finds new hope that his own may yet come to life.