All items: Jean Rhys

Jane is completely reliant on Rochester's account of his marriage; he refers to Bertha's madness as hereditary but also admits that she had been a desirable woman and the centre of attention when they met.

Rukhsana Ahmad speaks with John Siddique about her peripatetic childhood in Pakistan, how her concern for other people motivates her to keep writing across years and genres, and how she’s avoided the constraints of the ‘post-colonial’.

Tiffany Murray’s mother worked for a time as a cook for various rock bands, including Freddie Mercury’s Queen. Here, Murray describes what it was like growing up in such ‘Bohemian’ company.
Most of the Victorians I loved have lost their shine, too, for me, except George Eliot; her luminous sense of justice and vision distinguish her. However, recently Hilary Mantel has begun to supplant her.
This is reading as a meander and a different kind of immersion in a subject than the reading I do when I'm working on poems with a specific theme. I tend to read novels to relax or to be lost in a narrative.

Cherise Saywell describes how an unexpected writing career descended into paralysis, and how a short and anonymously-published piece helped her to reconnect with what she loves about writing.

Cynthia Rogerson explains how escaping to a weekly writing group turned her from a frustrated mother-of-many to a fledgling novelist, who discovered that as far as family went, ‘it was extraordinary how happy we all were just suiting ourselves’.

Jean Rhys’s 1966 novel, Wide Sargasso Sea, captivated Cherise Saywell when she first read it at the age of twenty, offering insights into the postcolonial world which reflected her own experience as a young Australian writer.
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