All items: John Le Carré

Clare Bayley reflects on the process of choosing names for characters and gives some famous examples, from Le Carré to Shakespeare, of writers who’ve answered the question: ‘What’s in a name?’ in an intriguing or provocative way.
Reading as a writer and not just as a reader is a different experience, both richer and less carefree; instead of simply enjoying the ride now you are paying attention to the mechanism that makes it possible
I don't binge on authors. I am amazed by people who boast (there can be no other word) that they re-read the complete Dickens once a year. I couldn't do that. I am simply too slow a reader.
Arriving in Amsterdam to research a novel set during the Occupation, Christina Koning found herself in the middle of the city’s annual street party. At first this carnival atmosphere seemed a distraction from the themes of her book, but then she began to see that it might prove relevant after all.
Having grown up with a chronic illness, Ann Morgan became fascinated by the number of other writers who have suffered from poor health and by the way some have explored this in their writing.
Why do some writers choose to use a name other than the one they were born with for their writing? John Pilkington looks at some of the reasons why authors throughout history have adopted pseudonyms, and wonders if it has something to do with the need to reinvent oneself.
On her first visit to Berlin, Christina Koning packed a suitcase full of novels, and found they offered a surprising amount of insight into the city’s troubled past, as well as causing her to reflect on its inspiring present.