All items: John Masefield

A poet who does not figure in my childhood anthology but who has become very important for me in adulthood is Emily Dickinson. If Dylan Thomas introduces you to intoxication, Dickinson shows you how to distill it.
Poetry, furnished with ordinary people like bus drivers and sad aunts, and written in a language that was playful, witty and brand new, had an energy that was irresistibly exciting; it was the poetic cousin to The Beatles.
Reading habits become part of our legacy. A family that reads together passes down a wonderful inheritance; words enveloped in love, and thus given meaning.
As a young teenager in rural Ayrshire, Gerry Cambridge became interested in birdwatching — a fascination which has helped define his life, and a powerful influence on his poetry.

William Palmer explains the importance of craft, skill and empathy in successful fiction, and examines where novice writers often go wrong.

John Siddique introduces the 'laboratory' of his notebook’s pages, and explains how keeping a journal can lead to 'a more conscious and loving way to live'.