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How does one teach writing? It’s not a craft. I attended a one-day workshop in wooden spoon making, great fun it was, and that was a craft. Or in my case a bodge. Literature is an art form. As Doris Lessing said, ‘There are no laws for the novel'.
Ray French examines the concept of voice confrontation – the term for a dislike of one’s own speaking voice – and the implications for writers who must read their work aloud, going back to his roots to discover the many elements that inform his approach to performing his writing.
20-01-2022

In the first instalment of 'My Genre’s Status', we talk to writers who feel that the kind of writing they do tends to be looked down upon, and consider the factors that may contribute to certain fields being literature's poor relations.

03-09-2020

Tim Pears explores the double bind that professional authors find themselves in when teaching creative writing, and the unteachable essentials of style and the ‘strangeness’ that reveals the world anew.

Andrew Cowan considers the history of university Creative Writing courses in the UK, their roots in the longer-established English Composition and Creative Writing strands in the US, and the way in which Creative Writing can be vocational even beyond the confines of professional authorship.

27-09-2018

Jonny Wright talks to John Siddique about his need to write the roles that have been missing from theatre repertoire, his attraction to protagonists who find themselves at odds with the world, and the literary values of Hip Hop.

19-01-2017

John Siddique speaks with Frances Byrnes about his troubled childhood, how literature provided him with a proxy family, and the power of colours in his own writing.

08-09-2016

William Palmer explains the importance of craft, skill and empathy in successful fiction, and examines where novice writers often go wrong.

John Siddique introduces the 'laboratory' of his notebook’s pages, and explains how keeping a journal can lead to 'a more conscious and loving way to live'.

09-07-2015

The RLF provides an inside look at the diverse and surprising ways in which contemporary writers support themselves beyond their writing lives.

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