All items: Katharine Grant

In the course of his writing career, Robin Blake has become used to being asked all kinds of questions by members of the public. But what he describes as ‘not really a question at all, but a challenge’ is his least favourite of these.
An author’s ideas are essential to the writing process, but how and why do they arise? Katharine Grant considers various possibilities.
Audiobooks are for non-readers, thought Katharine Grant — before she tried them and fell under their spell. Now, reading Joyce, she has become ‘one of those laughing walkers you instinctively avoid’; reading Edmund de Waal, she is a woman who cries at the supermarket checkout.

Is writing a ruthless business? How much honesty is too much? Should you mine your own life for stories? RLF writers explore this literary quandary in 'The Splinter of Ice'.

Do reader’s care about seasonal lists? Heavy-duty books for Autumn and fluffy reads for the beach? Not a bit, says Katharine Grant. There was a time when seasonal publishing was dictated by the barges arriving laden with books; but with cheap printing, the re-order, and e-book, publishing seasons have become like fashion seasons: micro-sized and consumer led.
Writing for emotional survival is familiar; writing for physical survival less so. Yet the physical act of writing raised Sara Coleridge from her sickbed, reassures Hilary Mantel, comforts Laura Hillenbrand and, during a recent medical crisis, kept Katharine Grant ‘threaded to the world’. Never mind words, the act of writing is medicine.