All items: Katharine McMahon

Katharine McMahon celebrates the role that public libraries have played in her life, from her earliest discovery of the magic of books as a child, to her later career as a writer.
As a writer of novels set in the past, Katharine McMahon has come to realise that the preoccupations she addresses in her fiction are also those of the present day, and that the distinction between ‘historical’ and ‘contemporary’ fiction may have outlived its usefulness.
An avid reader from childhood, Katharine McMahon found herself increasingly drawn into the world of that precociously literary family the Brontës, finding in their life histories, as much as in their novels, echoes of her own preoccupations and experience.

Is writing a ruthless business? How much honesty is too much? Should you mine your own life for stories? RLF writers explore this literary quandary in 'The Splinter of Ice'.

Jane Feaver examines the nostalgic impulse and its relationship with the pastoral, and celebrates their combined generative power in the act of writing.

Katharine McMahon considers the role that location plays in historical fiction, and at what point a writer should go and explore it.

The RLF provides an inside look at the diverse and surprising ways in which contemporary writers support themselves beyond their writing lives.