All items: Katherine Mansfield

In recent decades I've largely read novels or non-fiction, but then I got involved with a community based RLF project, the Reading Round, which is entirely built around short fiction, and my interest was revived.
I found a reflection of my own life and ambition in Mansfield's, bought a cheap edition of her short stories, and read them until the binding fell apart and it had to be held together with an elastic band. Her writing became essential to me.
These are short story writers and novelists. I write biography, social history and memoir and yet I have learned from them all; factual writing borrowing some of fiction's clothes.
Why do some writers choose to use a name other than the one they were born with for their writing? John Pilkington looks at some of the reasons why authors throughout history have adopted pseudonyms, and wonders if it has something to do with the need to reinvent oneself.

Kathleen Jones tells Frances Byrnes about the mythic relationships between people and their landscapes in her writing — be it a disturbing poem set in her now-abandoned childhood Cumbrian fell home, or fierce non-fiction about the Haida Gwaii islands.

ded for publication but that does not lessen their potential influence. In this miniature memoir – and fierce defence of the epistolary form – the novelist Cynthia Rogerson considers the many ways that letters she has written have affected her life and the lives of those close to her.