All items: Miranda Miller

Virginia Woolf's fiction explores the inner lives of intelligent women with courage and originality; she searched for, and found, a way of telling a story that was different.
Miranda Miller describes how a troubling encounter in childhood has remained with her, surfacing recently as she reflects on a new direction for her writing.
Iris Murdoch advised me to put something for everybody into my novels. She meant that a novel has to work at different levels for different kinds of readers; as a story, as an entertainment, as a page-turner, and as a way of exploring interesting ideas.

Ali Knight explores the murky depths of the Grand Union Canal in Londonand explains how it inspires her crime fiction.

John Greening takes us to the poetic village of Little Gidding and its nearby literary landmarks.

Miranda Miller introduces us to Henry James’ Lamb House in Rye and its connections with various writers.

According to Miranda Miller, Patrick Hamilton is ‘one of the great London writers’, whose novels offer a dark and troubling picture of the postwar years, reflecting, she suggests, the turbulent events of his own life. 

As a writer of historical fiction, Miranda Miller has long been accustomed to seeing the world in duplicate, both as it exists in the present and as it once existed in the past. For her, walking around London or Rome involves a kind of ‘double vision’, allowing her to see each place in its current and former incarnations.
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