All items: mother

Trish Cooke speaks with Caroline Sanderson about her children’s picturebooks and the eerie prescience of some of her illustrators, exploring fairytales in books and pantomime, and the real-life tragic roots of a dramatic work for Black Lives Matter.

Under contract to produce my second novel and with the clock loudly ticking, the strain of not being able to write was disastrously compounded by the strain of divorce.

Cynthia Rogerson takes us on a wry and rueful whistlestop tour of the perils, pleasures and pitfalls of the writing life, for both writers and those who have to put up with them.

Anna Reynolds encounters a perplexing dilemma when an ostensible writing necessity, the ‘room of one’s own’, becomes an obstacle to progress instead of a creative oasis.

Trish Cooke speaks with Caroline Sanderson about her Dominican heritage, her Yorkshire upbringing, how her parents’ love of stories inspired her as a teller of tales, and how her career kicked off in multiple directions all at once.

I was reading Chekhov short stories soon after the birth and the thought came to me that if I tried to write now I should know how to do it.
Katharine McMahon celebrates the role that public libraries have played in her life, from her earliest discovery of the magic of books as a child, to her later career as a writer.

Penny Hancock speaks with John Greening about discovering dark inner places as a crime writer, inhabiting different characters, real-life story inspirations and her writing approaches and motivations.

In ‘My Hero', we talk to a number of RLF writers about their personal heroes, and how those heroes have had an impact on their lives and their writing.