All items: Percy Bysshe Shelley

Joanne Limburg and our host Julia Copus discuss two classic poems by Mathilde Blind, a once-celebrated, now neglected poet, scholar and intellectual, in another instalment of our special ‘Poetry Break’ series.

Are writers mad — or only very sane? Horatio Clare reflects on this conundrum, with relation to his own experience of mental illness.
Like many young writers, Lizzie Nunnery resisted the idea that literary inspiration needed to be subjected to editing and revision. But then she came to see these as an organic, and essential, part of the writing process.
Enchanted by the seductive music of this poem, its strangeness but also its powerful sense of reality; I didn't know exactly what it meant in the sense of its paraphrasable content, but its potency was unignorable. Imagine if one could write like this!

Jackie Wills joins host Julia Copus to discuss two favourite classic poems, ‘How do I love thee?’ and ‘Grief', both by Elizabeth Barrett Browning, in our ongoing 'Poetry Break' series.

In the course of his writing career, Brian McCabe has discerned the influence of a number of other writers on his own work — influences which may or may not have proved enduring. Here he considers some of the more important.
I read Macbeth first and happened to learn half of it by heart. This was Shakespeare's achievement not of my memory; after reading Shakespeare it's more difficult to forget him than to remember other poets.
As an avid reader of poetry, Roy Bainton had always felt it was beyond his capabilities to write it. Then a fortuitous encounter with another RLF writer – and a provocative study of poetry by Stephen Fry – made him think again.
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