All items: printing

I've heard tell of the psychopathology of answering machines, the ghost-in-the-machine poetry of microprocessors, but I've watched the use of Facebook profiling by editorial committees: what is our demographic looking for?
As the only writer in a group of visual artists taking part in a project to restore a medieval tower as an arts centre, Deborah Gearing felt initially out of her depth. But then she found that collaborating with artists in other mediums had a liberating effect on her writing.

Amanda Mitchison speaks with John Siddique about her family’s writing legacy, her eccentric newsroom roles in the Vatican and Cairo, the current plight of career journalists, and her wistful links to Scotland.

An integral part of the thinking process, with sometimes surprising, counterintuitive results that would never have been reached without this process; and that too is how writing can change a writer.

Charles Boyle speaks with Julia Copus about literary gender-swapping, the role that small presses have to play in today’s publishing world, and how serendipity has helped shape his life and career.

‘Lost objects and unreliable memories… are everywhere in my writing,’ says James McConnachie – wondering if perhaps this preoccupation with missing and destroyed documents, contended versions of history, and rescuing facts from obscurity might have its origin in something that happened in his childhood – the loss of a beloved toy car.

Jan Marsh speaks with James McConnachie about her renowned biographies, the attraction of art history and the advantages of being ‘on the fringes of scholarship’, and always doing something new.

As a young man, Jonathan Falla worked in a gloriously antiquated Javanese print shop. The stories he heard about Indonesia’s war of independence inspired a novel about a Dutch colonial printer in Java. Falla’s experiences in the print shop, meanwhile, inspired his decision to privately print his novel in a specially designed limited edition.
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