All items: Raymond Chandler

"New Guinea is not at all a childish dream; West Papua is not at all a childish dream. It is a call. You are perfectly right to answer it". I went.

Brian McCabe speaks with Geoff Hattersley about why mathematicians are a bit like artists, how something being funny doesn’t mean it’s light, and the process of imaginatively recreating the worldview of a child.

John Keay explains why writing a foreign nation’s history is no more presumptuous than writing about Picts and Scots, and shares his enthusiasm for RH Tawney, a man who was ‘more history writer than historian’.

Tobias Jones considers, as both reader and writer, the fascination of the true crime genre, and the profound truths with which it can connect us.

Faced with the perennial question for writers of ‘how do you come up with your plots?’ David Davies considers his own and others’ practice, and finds that it depends very much on the kind of writer you are, as to whether you spend months on research and planning before putting pen to paper, or rely on that moment of inspiration to set your story in motion.
Campaigners are calling for more fiction – particularly children’s and young-adult fiction – to feature disabled characters. Yet in one genre, the detective novel, disabled protagonists have a long and distinguished history. Christina Koning connects that curious commonplace to another cliché, that of the emotionally damaged detective — and considers what drove her to make her own detective hero blind.