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12-10-2023

Jeremy Treglown speaks with Ann Morgan about choosing biographical subjects, the fallibility of memory, trying to tell real-life stories fairly and the experience of being a critic as well as an author.

While my childhood was in many ways lonely, in my mind I travelled widely. A therapist once asked me who my role models had been, since my parents seemed so absent. I thought for a moment and then said ‘Books’. It was the greatest gift they could have given me.
'As well as learning about history it was good for our reflexes because we had to be on the ball and duck or else you could get killed or just knocked out like Vivienne Pryce-Jones who took a direct hit between the eyes from a German Fokker.'
28-10-2021

Linda Cracknell speaks with Doug Johnstone about creative non-fiction, walking as working, her community activities and residencies in Scotland and overseas, her radio drama work and her new calling to write about the sea.

Kate Rhodes on her search for the perfect island writing retreat and the famous writers who’ve found solace and inspiration in their own island hideaways.
17-06-2021

Linda Cracknell travels to France in the footsteps of Robert Louis Stevenson, considering the effects of motion and travel on writing and discovering that sitting beside a river can be as much of a journey as sitting on a long distance train.

Dan Richards visits the beautiful archipelago that provided both part-time home and profound inspiration for one of Finland’s best-loved writers.

25-03-2021

Former RLF Trustee Richard Holmes speaks with Gabriel Gbadamosi about the intrusions and liberations of biographical research, shares some useful advice for aspiring biographers and considers the impact of photography and the changing nature of biography as a form.

18-03-2021

Former RLF Trustee Richard Holmes speaks with Gabriel Gbadamosi about falling in love with your biographical subjects, the importance of notebooks and the biographer’s own experience, the role of empathy and the “imaginary conversation” between biographer and subject.

13-02-2020

Claire Harman speaks with Caroline Sanderson about the painstaking, and sometimes obsessive art of literary biography, and how careful detective work can bring new insights into even the most written-about lives.

05-12-2019

Max Eilenberg speaks with John Siddique about the importance of love in children’s fiction, his previous career in publishing, retelling a traditional fairytale and his enduring enthusiasm for the work of Bob Dylan.

01-08-2019

Donny O'Rourke takes us to Edinburgh in August, for a Lughnasadh harvest festival — but one of culture, not of crops.

Tiffany Murray flees the over-familiar, but still creatively disabling, complaints of a despondent writer, by escaping to the strange new world of Iceland and its music.

When researching his historical novels, Andrew Martin always starts with a map drawn around the time in which his story is set, in order to explore at first-hand the world he is trying to envisage. This has led him to some surprising revelations — and occasional near-mishaps.
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