All items: Robert Lowell

Duncan Forbes describes the challenges and consolations of translating poetry and how it can help us to gain an insight into earlier times, distant cultures and other minds.

Tracey Herd speaks with Julia Copus about the prevalence of female iconography in her work, the low status of writing based on popular culture, and how the spirits of the truly gifted can live on through music, film and literature.

Cliff Yates speaks with Geoff Hattersley about changing from school hater to school teacher, his poetry collections and his love of performing, and shares some poems featuring his distinctive touch of surrealism.

Is writing a ruthless business? How much honesty is too much? Should you mine your own life for stories? RLF writers explore this literary quandary in 'The Splinter of Ice'.

Every writer has a file, a drawer or a cupboard of unfinished or unpublished books. After going through his own dusty box file, Rupert Christiansen considers the classic novels that once lived as ‘zombies’ — and finds new hope that his own may yet come to life.
Ezra Pound's Cathay is one hundred this year. William Carlos Williams said that if they’d been original poems they'd have made Pound the world's greatest living poet. But the poems were translations from Chinese – a language Pound could neither read not speak. Yet Clare Pollard argues that Pound felt his way through the poems with an integrity that set a new bar in translation.