All items: Samuel Beckett

Novels, depending on the genre, allow the reader to bring much of their own personal life to their stories, whereas plays are a different beast and rely on a great production and great acting.
In the course of his writing career, Robin Blake has become used to being asked all kinds of questions by members of the public. But what he describes as ‘not really a question at all, but a challenge’ is his least favourite of these.

Dipo Agboluaje explains how migrating from London to his family’s homeland of Nigeria as a young boy shaped his interest in playwriting, with inspiration along the way from diverse mythologies.

Penny Hancock wonders when it's legitimate, if your professional occupation leaves you free to manage your own time and involves an activity other people do simply for pleasure, to say that writing is your career?

Are writers mad — or only very sane? Horatio Clare reflects on this conundrum, with relation to his own experience of mental illness.
I don't binge on authors. I am amazed by people who boast (there can be no other word) that they re-read the complete Dickens once a year. I couldn't do that. I am simply too slow a reader.
The precision of Wodehouse, the economy of Fitzgerald and the wild comic invention of Flann O'Brien; these then are the elements that inspire me.
That's how it is with me; once you've subsumed your own tone to the great and the good, it's curtains for plot development and time to put the kettle on.

Todd McEwen tells Frances Byrnes about how his early life in Southern California gave him abundance – in literature and landscape – but also taught him scepticism and helped him develop his distinctive writing voice.

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