All items: Seamus Heaney

Mimi Khalvati speaks with John Greening about losing her Persian origins in an Isle of Wight boarding school, the creative benefits of constrained poetic forms, the neglected role of abstraction in English poetry and why she co-founded the Poetry School.

The compulsion to write is paradoxically both a celebration of life, and a protest at its passing; not that I think about this when I'm actually at my desk with a pen in my hand.

Doug Johnstone speaks with Cherise Saywell about shifting from engineering to domestic noir via music journalism, exploring conflicted masculinity in his work, and being part of the Tartan Noir family of Scottish crime writers.

Maura Dooley, former RLF trustee, speaks with Jane Draycott about her complex connections with her Irish heritage, reaching to the realm of the 'beyond' when translating the work of Iranian poet Azita Ghahreman, and the unanticipated rewards of her residency at Jane Austen's Hampshire cottage.

Are writers mad — or only very sane? Horatio Clare reflects on this conundrum, with relation to his own experience of mental illness.
The gift of a poem from Seamus Heaney to the author’s mother unlocked childhood memories for Bernie McGill of the ‘settle bed’ which is the subject of the poem, and of the elderly woman to whom it belonged.
Duncan Forbes describes the challenges and consolations of translating poetry and how it can help us to gain an insight into earlier times, distant cultures and other minds.
The inspiration here has involved a movement from poetry to prose. This is something that pleases me immensely; one genre fertilising another.