All items: Seamus Heaney

The inspiration here has involved a movement from poetry to prose. This is something that pleases me immensely; one genre fertilising another.

Ali Knight explores the murky depths of the Grand Union Canal in Londonand explains how it inspires her crime fiction.

John Greening takes us to the poetic village of Little Gidding and its nearby literary landmarks.

Miranda Miller introduces us to Henry James’ Lamb House in Rye and its connections with various writers.

In the course of his writing career, Brian McCabe has discerned the influence of a number of other writers on his own work — influences which may or may not have proved enduring. Here he considers some of the more important.
As an avid reader of poetry, Roy Bainton had always felt it was beyond his capabilities to write it. Then a fortuitous encounter with another RLF writer – and a provocative study of poetry by Stephen Fry – made him think again.
There are poets I love but will hesitate to read if I am in the middle of writing a poem because I know their style is infectious; Ted Hughes for instance, or Seamus Heaney. There's something Heaney-esque in every male poet of a certain age.
Can coincidence, that seemingly magical conjunction of events, play a part in poetry? John Greening considers some famous and more personal examples of its power.
As a young poet, Gerry Cambridge was inspired and encouraged by the handwritten letters he received from other poets. As letters become increasingly a rarity in an age of email, he reflects on the ways in which these ‘joys of earth’ could once, and can still, nourish a writing life.

Horatio Clare ponders the necessary pragmatism of the professional writer, and shares a glimpse of what writers really talk about amongst themselves.

Clare Pollard celebrates the playfulness and variety of nonsense verse, sharing examples from across the centuries.