All items: Siegfried Sassoon

Jane Shilling speaks with Robin Blake about how learning to hunt inspired her first memoir, accepting botox in the name of art, writing without an audience in mind and moving to fiction in a new, metrics-driven publishing climate.

Should poetry be about something — other than itself? asks John Greening, considering some famous examples of works that have defied this question, as well as others which have dared to be topical, even at the risk of becoming irrelevant over time.

Nicholas Murray talks with George Miller about his book on the British poets of the first world war, and his own career as a poet, including his most recent collection of animal poems.

Nicholas Murray is the author of several biographies, and it is literary biography – and in particular his acclaimed life of Huxley – that he discusses here with George Miller.

Charlotte Mew ought to be better known. Brittle, self-regarding and a hugely talented poet, she craved renown. Yet unlike her contemporary Virginia Woolf, Mew detested the gushing world of literary sociability: she shunned Woolf’s friendship, tripped up would-be patrons and snapped at offers of preferment. It cost Mew her reputation, says Julia Copus, but also her peace of mind.