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Paul Dodgson on his experience of learning Welsh as a second language and how it’s changed his appreciation of his mother tongue.
Amanda Dalton considers the recurring theme of ‘home’ in her writing and theatre work and investigates how this creative obsession began.
20-10-2022

Penny Boxall seeks inspiration at Laurence Sterne’s Shandy Hall, wondering how to move forward as a writer after the loss of her mother and her previous creative rituals.

Jonathan Edwards considers the poet WH Davies, whose extensive body of work forms a bridge between two worlds - the natural beauty of South Wales, and the gritty reality of early 20th century London and its poverty.

08-09-2022

Andy Jackson speaks with John Greening about the patron saints of obscure and modern things, the sonnet as a ‘design classic’, anthologising as the joy of involving other poets in ‘daft ideas’ and the fun of ‘otwituaries’.

'Good nature poetry is about looking, but it's also about having the right vocabulary, which most of us townies are losing. It's worth reading a few poets who really know about trees and flowers.'
'Agatha Christie, for example, was so shy she would retreat from a party even as she stood at the door. For the tenth anniversary of The Mousetrap, she arrived at The Savoy celebration and was turned away, unable to admit who she was.'
'Most poets have second jobs. No, let me put that another way; all poets have second jobs. In many cases, the second job is really the first job, and writing poetry is the second one.'
As an avid reader of poetry, Roy Bainton had always felt it was beyond his capabilities to write it. Then a fortuitous encounter with another RLF writer – and a provocative study of poetry by Stephen Fry – made him think again.
25-01-2018

Clare Pollard talks with Julia Copus about her experiences of motherhood, her thoughts about politics, and how it feels to be labeled a ‘Bad Girl’ of the literary scene.

Should poetry be about something — other than itself? asks John Greening, considering some famous examples of works that have defied this question, as well as others which have dared to be topical, even at the risk of becoming irrelevant over time.
25-06-2015

Ron Butlin explains the role of the Edinburgh Makar, describing how he came to the job and his varied experiences as a civic poet in the Athens of the North.

Gerry Cambridge speaks with Kona Macphee about his route into writing, living simply and the pleasures of editorship.

Ezra Pound's Cathay is one hundred this year. William Carlos Williams said that if they’d been original poems they'd have made Pound the world's greatest living poet. But the poems were translations from Chinese – a language Pound could neither read not speak. Yet Clare Pollard argues that Pound felt his way through the poems with an integrity that set a new bar in translation.
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